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2015 Election – what are the implications for employment law?

At the time of writing we are only days away from the 2015 General Election. After what has felt like the longest campaign in history, we take a look at the main parties manifesto commitments in a number of key areas                                          

 

 

 
 

Conservatives

 
 

Greens

 
 

Labour

 
 

Liberal Democrats

 
 

UKIP

 
 

Wages and   National Minimum Wage (NMW)

 
 

·           Increase NMW to £6.70 and to £8 by 2020

 

·           Support the Living wage

 
 

·           The NMW will be a ‘living wage for all’ by increasing to £10 by   2020

 
 

·           Increase NMW to £8 by 2019

 

·           Tax rebates for businesses paying the Living Wage

 
 

·           No commitment on figures, but will work with the Low Pay   commission to consider ways of increasing wages without damaging employment   prospects

 
 

·           Focus on enforcement and reverse the cuts to the number of   enforcement inspectors

 
 

Discrimination

 
 

·          Larger employers to publish details of gender pay gaps

 
 

·          Make equal pay ‘a reality’

 
 

·           Prevent the exploitation of Migrant workers, making it a   criminal offence to undercut wages

 
 

·          Larger employers to publish details of gender pay gaps

 
 

·           A commitment to allow British businesses to choose to employ   British citizens first. This would of course be a direct contravention of EU   equality law.

 
 

Family Friendly

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

·           Double paid paternity leave from 2 to 4 weeks

 
 

·           An additional month to shared parental leave for fathers on a   ‘use it or lose it basis’ – it cannot be transferred to the mother

 
 

 

 
 

Zero Hours   Contracts

 
 

·          Outlaw Exclusivity Clauses which require employees to be   available for an employer at all times

 
 

·           End ‘abuse’ of zero hours contracts

 
 

·           Outlaw Exclusivity Clauses which require employees to be   available for an employer at all times

 

·           Possible ‘regular’ contract after a fixed period

 
 

·           End ‘abuse’ of zero hours contracts

 

·           Possible ‘regular’ contract after a fixed period

 
 

·           Outlaw Exclusivity Clauses which require employees to be   available for an employer at all times

 

·           Possible ‘regular’ contract after a fixed period

 
 

Tribunal Reform

 
 

 

 
 

·          Reduction in Fees

 
 

·           Abolish Fees and ACAS to review the tribunal process as a whole

 
 

·           Review Fees